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“What you haven’t done, will torment you” – Charles Dickens

Newborn Baby in Mother Hand

It may be sad – but I read sometimes about what people regret when they are coming to the end of their lives.  To spend time and enjoy time with their friends and family, seems to be the main theme that comes ahead of money/success etc every time I read a story.

It makes a lot of sense – it would be good to create some financial stability for your family (and I am working on that), but if it is at the expense of them and you enjoying each others company – and “life”, then is money really that important? Does it become a material aim?

I am grateful for everything I have – a hardworking mum and dad – that instilled in me the work ethic I truly believe in today.  But that work ethic is not to be rich and carefree so you don’t have to work – it is to work for the benefit of your family and friends, and ensure that they are cared for, and have what they need.

No-one in this world needs to be rich in a money sense – rich to one person is having a million dollars/pounds in the bank – to another, it is having shoes so they can walk miles every day to the well where they can bring back water for their families.  Which would you say is the richer?

One is maybe what you desire, the other is having what you need to support your family.

My better half reads a lot of books – and we’ve had a lot of conversations about simpler times that is part of the back story in many of the books she reads.  People may not have had all the gadgets and comforts we have today – but many of them seemed happier for it. They concentrated on what was important – relationships, family, friends – and that’s what their energy and focus was on… not getting the newest model of iPhone or the next Xbox or whatever.

Do we really need all those frivolous distractions in our life? Would the money frittered away on them, be better spent flattening out the huge difference between rich and poor – nor just in your own country, but across the world. If all the wealth in the world were to be shared, would anyone of us be poor?

If we lived in a world where everyone shared resources and knowledge, would anyone need to be financially rich?  I don’t think we would.  If everything were shared, I would do a website for a plumber who came to fix my pipe.  He would put in a shower for someone who fixed his car. The guy who fixed the car may help someone else… and so the way of the world would be.

Pay It Forward

Do something for the sake of doing it for the good of others.  That will bring you so much gratitude and sense of belonging – what you get out, is what you put in.  Every action has a reaction – only you decide if it’s for the good or the bad.

Final Thought

Also, please don’t dwell on it but, if you were to think about your last day here on this Earth – what would you wish you had more of?  Money? Maybe, but what good would it do you on your last day?

How about family and friends and fun? Why not live each day as if it were your last and enjoy what you have right now? Leave a connection with you of enjoying and making the most of your life, and doing something for others too. Have a great time while you’re here, but think about what you can do to make others realise what they have to offer too.

All the best, Mark

Mark Tait
 

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 16 comments
Katie - June 27, 2014

I believe that there is enough in the world to meet everyone’s needs if it was shared out better, enjoyed your post

Reply
    admin - June 28, 2014

    Hi – I agree – there are so many “wealthy” people living next to people who have nothing – but I also think some people who have a simpler life (I’m not talking about people who are ill or starving), probably feel more fulfilled. The others who do desperately need help, are another case. We’re all on the same little blue dot in space – we shouldn’t have extremes as we do.

    All the best, Mark

    Reply
Susan Hinds - June 28, 2014

Nice story. My wish is for more mums and dads to be able to work from home. I believe that this world would be a much better place and kids would be happier if they had more quality time with their parents. Well done on your decision to make the commitment to improve your life.

Reply
    admin - June 28, 2014

    Hi Susan – thank you.

    I will get to the point where I can spend more time at home – that is one of my goals.

    I wish you well on your journey too,

    Mark

    Reply
Garth Oellermann - June 28, 2014

Hi Mark
I posted an article to my website called “Difference Between Need and Want”. Which dealt with what you have written here, just from a different perspective.
Most of us are chasing material things, forgetting about the richness of just being human.
Thanks for this thought provoking post.
Garth

Reply
    admin - June 28, 2014

    Hi Garth – thank you – I will read over your post too.

    Cheers, Mark

    Reply
coolcity - June 28, 2014

This is the “Star Trek” ideal, where there is no money and you get on in life by being better at what you do. Even in today’s world nobody needs to be rich. I think the problem lies with the fact that the distribution of wealth means that some people will have far more than they ever need, even in our own countries, while others are starving and living in appalling conditions.

But how do you sort it out? Give 100 people £1 million each and some would blow it on luxuries while others would start businesses, maybe become successful and invest it in something that would benefit the poor and the ill.

I’m struggling at the moment too – not so much that i don’t have a roof over my head and food on the table, something some people will never have, but at the same time when I have had more money to spare I have bought things I never needed. A near neighbour was showing off his new car recently but I asked him, does it really do anything that mine doesn’t?

Do millions of people really need a top-end smartphone when millions of people elsewhere have no food? Yet we all do it. Are we any better than over-wealthy millionaires then? Or should those who have earned the money be morally entitled to do whatever they want to do with it?

Reply
    admin - June 28, 2014

    Hi Gary – sometimes the Star Trek ideal seems a very “rich” one to live by.

    I do believe in working for reward (financial or favours) – and not expecting it – but I also recognise there are a lot of people in the world who don’t have the luxury of any work, so can’t get out of that situation easily, without others helping.

    All the best, Mark

    Reply
Glenda Williams - June 28, 2014

Hi Mark,
Those are some great thoughts. In the world today, many people think that if they just had another xx amount of dollars, life would be so much better. Money is nothing but a tool to use in exchange for something you want or need.

In many lives though it has become a God. I don’t have a lot of money but I feel that I am rich. I am rich in the things that count. People and pets who love me enrich my life. I have a peace with God that passes the understanding of the world.

Success for me is knowing I am where I am supposed to be in life, not rich, not poor. I guess that you could say that is where real riches lie. Thanks for this post.

Reply
    admin - June 28, 2014

    Hi Glenda – thank you.

    I feel very rich for the things I do have in life too, and very thank full for my family and friends.

    All the best, Mark

    Reply
Burnzy - June 28, 2014

I have been on both sides of money and I must say I am much happier having what I need and not what I want. If people helped each other out more instead of all this greed the world would be a better place. I know that sounded like a miss america quote but true!!
Great post and have a great day!!

Reply
    admin - June 28, 2014

    Hi Burnzy – I don’t think it sounds like Miss America at all – I think it sounds like a really sensible view on how we should live our lives.

    There’s too much poverty and war – and people suffering needlessly – and on the other hand, there’s someone somewhere complaining because their champagne isn’t chilled enough. Then there’s the person living off the land, who just doesn’t need anything we take for granted to be essentials, and something we couldn’t live without.

    All the best, Mark

    Reply
Vel Calson - June 29, 2014

Hi Mark, I am 81 years old and I know in my head that my years here on earth are just around the corner, no doubt about it. But I prefer to live life as though I have years and years more to live. I manage on my Social Security income, and would like to make some extra money to do more traveling. I have my adult children, grandchildren and great grandchildren living in Florida, Texas, North Dakota, California and Washington and most of them, I only see every year or two. I would just like to visit them a little more often.

Great blog. My best wishes to you and your family.

Vel

Reply
    admin - July 1, 2014

    Hi Vel.

    I know your site – it’s very comprehensive, and so I hope you are achieving what you need to help you visit your family more often.

    My family (parents, sister, nephews etc) are far away too – I would love to just be able to see them whenever I wanted – I will work towards that too.

    Thank you for your comments, and all the best to you and your family too.

    Cheers, Mark

    Reply
Cathy - July 2, 2014

There’s a small part of me that want to be financially rich so that I don’t have to have the worries of money and paying the debts. The peculiar thing is without the anxiety of worrying about money, I wouldn’t have come up with creative ways about saving or investing my money for better purpose like what I am doing. I wouldn’t appreciate the value of money and to realize that even when I am loaded with cash, I will never be able to buy the time/the opportunity that I might have missed in life.

Reply
    admin - July 13, 2014

    Hi Cathy – thanks for your comment.

    I don’t think money can buy everything, which is what I was trying to put across in the post. There are more important things that can makes our lives rich.

    All the best, Mark

    Reply

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